Thursday, November 08, 2007

Show me...

Quick: Do the sentences "Show me." and "Seeing is believing." express the same idea?

2 comments:

katrina337 said...

To an extent (yes, that was my impulsive answer). "Show me" can denote using your visual sense in order to believe something, in which case it is the same as "seeing is believing". However, "show me" can also denote taking in the experience of something in order to actually comprehend it, not just believe it. I can believe something without understanding it, though I usually choose not to. "Show me" for gaining the experience would involve more senses than just your sight, it would involve feeling and hearing at the least, and possibly taste and smell. So no, they're not really. I take "show me" to ask more for meaning, while "seeing is believing" is more just blind (or...whatever...uncomprehending) acceptance.

StarD said...

Well "Show me" in the english language is actually a Command upon a person to "do something" thereby "seeing is believing." is a statement. But besides that they both express a same idea. From my knowledge seeing is really believing but from there, there can be many lies. For example think about optical illusions. If "seeing is believing" then optical illusions are showing that the eye can be tricked, and the term "Show me" is kinda like the idea that "I am challenging your argument therefore i demand proof visually". I really don't know if my idea actually got through but hopefully it did. Basically what i was saying was that seeing IS believing and that show me is just a statement questioning someone's "idea" or "statement" thereby challenging it.